Shooting a wedding with Fuji XF60mm

Anyone who believes wedding photographers have it easy better think again.  Last weekend as a wedding guest I took my Fuji XE2 along, with XF 60mm attached and for lower light,  the XF35mm 1.4 in my pocket. The official wedding photographer had two huge camera bags with bodies and lenses bulging out. He arrived early to shoot guests as they came into the wonderful arena at 1.0pm and left at 4.0am the next morning having shot around 3000 frames. Our conversation went like this. ” Oh, for Goodness sake, what’s happened to the light, O bloody hell, I will have to change this lens, Oh Blimey, which is the brides Dad? where have they  all gone now, Ahhh. ? ” and so on. It was a wonderful overcast start to the day, saturated light but plenty of it.  No shadows all straightforward metering. Then the harsh sun broke though, reflections off the lake where the ceremony was being held, white bridesmaid dresses,  Ah, I could see him sweating.  He is kneeling down on the wet boardwalk as the bride arrives. Sun goes in, his shutter is chattering.  I guess he knows only his first shot will be in focus and properly exposed. Later we discuss how he can martial 150 guests for a group shot and where he can stand to capture the shot. Next, one huge marquee .. how do you get a decent white balance in there when the sun is in and out like a yoyo?  Two hours of food and speeches. He never stops !  By now kids are all over the place, the adults are several fizz, pimms and  vin rouge the worse for wear.  The place is chaos. We have quick word about Fuji cameras and tracking moving subjects. Light has gone and so has everyone else,  down to the dance tent with two fire pits burning, strobe lights flashing spots gleaming.  And so it continues while our photographer, who by now, has thrown in his lot with the rest of us flashes off random shots while dancing to Sex Machine.

In contrast I took 140 frames all jpgs, every one was beautifully exposed even with the varying light conditions. The XF60mm lens performed flawlessly, never hunted for focus and all the shots were amazingly clean and sharp. Later on I switched to the XF35mm, let the camera do it’s own thing and again all my images were bang on. Here are a few of my favourite shots processed in Lightroom 6 .

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Mist across the River Torridge

Here in North Devon, where the cool Atlantic ocean meets the green combs of Exmoor, two broad rivers run into the sea. Either side of the estuary stretch mile after mile of yellow sand and dunes,  a protected area, where sheep and ponies on one side roam and the other where nature takes it’s fine course. And spanning the broad river Torridge a great bridge, twin to the ancient one that has existed for ten centuries at Bideford port, the Little White Town. If you should rise early one morning, when the sea fret is drifting along Bideford Bar and make your way alongside the Tarka trail, you will find the mist spread across the bay and river.

 

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Silver Efex Pro and Nik collection now free

Well, it isn’t often there is a freebie, so I took advantage of Google’s offer to download the complete Nik collection which includes.. Silver Efex Pro and Colour Efex Pro plus others. .  These work as a Lightroom 6 plugin and seem to do the job.   Here is a link

This is a quick edit of Instow Quay taken on a gloomy day, some grain and glamour glow added,  taken with the brilliant Fuji XE2

 

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Gallery Le Fey profile by The Photographer Society

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Gallery le Fey:
thephotographerssociety:
PHOTOGRAPHER FOCUS · Drew De Rett (Gallery Le Fey)
http://gallerylefey.tumblr.com/
Drew De Rett is primarily a great landscape photographer. He defines himself as a rural photographer, determined to capture the views, reliefs and environments that surround him on the Atlantic coast of England. Photographing the sea, its changes and light, the coastal scenery… is a constant for him, who considers himself as someone alien to street photography, even if, occasionally he intends some explorations in that field.. Probably, in these occasions in which Drew photographs the beaches, that clouds announcing the imminent storm, the shines and lighting effects in the waters of the sea, or the way in which the setting sun draws its deep shadows on the coasts … is when we are in the presence of his most characteristic photography. Even on that many occasions in which the sea does not appear explicitly in his snapshots its presence is somehow sensed. Maybe it’s the light, the colors or the environment, but however the sea ‘is’ there …. it can almost be smelled!

 

 

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There are two cardinal points around which turns his landscape photography. The first is undoubtedly the light. This is a first-order expressive element in Drew’s photographs. Even in those snapshots in which is weak or pale, light assumes the expressive weight of the shot, although its presence can be only measured in subtle reflections or glitters, in faint sparkles that make their way through cloud laden skies, or between the long shadows and backlights that are drawn on clear sunsets. Drew’s work with light is always superb but is in these photographs in which we notice how masterfully he exposes,  assuming with ease the challenge of capturing faithfully atmospheres, colors and textures, even in foggy environments. Of course, in this desire to understand, to model the light that makes its way through his lens, Drew seems to feel equally comfortable when natural light is direct, even tough. Then his photographs captivate by the brightness and saturation of the colors, the way in which the sun highlights the textures of different materials, for its backlights…. The exposure here is again capital to get the right balance between light and shade, along with a perfect control of aperture from which Drew takes advantage to offer us captures characterized by its great depth of field. And beyond his landscape photography, this wonderful obsession for light that affects Drew becomes really apparent when we contemplate his portraits, the indoor photography, the architectures, his still life shots or his abstracts, these snapshots in which, through a creative approach he invites us to look with different eyes and out of its immediate context,  things of unexpected beauty. In all of them is difficult to avoid the impression that the subject is a mere pretext to press the shutter; that is the light – and I mean here the natural light, since Drew does not use flash-, its nuances, the way in which he brings to life the textures and materials, which really moved him  at the time of taking the shot. Do not miss the captures published in his blog chosen among that make up the series dedicated to the wonderful potter Clive Bowen. They’re a great example, of what I tell you

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The other axis around which revolves his magnificent landscape photography and generally all his work, is the composition. Probably there are few concepts in photography that are, at once, so basic and yet so difficult to master. This is because beyond the pure visual interest and the harmony that the composition may bring to an image, we should not forget that on it depends the way in which the photographer explains that fragment of reality that he wants to capture and the mechanisms that lead our attention to the essential element of a given photograph. And contemplating Drew’s work  it is really impossible not to notice the great care and thought underlying behind the composition of each of his photographs. Regarding this issue, Drew assured me having read somewhere that good composition is better than bad cropping, and  it’s evident that he applies systematically this maxim, though I am not referring only to something as prosaic as a reasonable application of the rule of thirds, the dynamic use of lines or the way in which negative space can be distributed as a way to properly highlight what attracted the attention of the  photographer -that also!-.  Beyond manual rules, composing involves to find in the elements of the image that balance, or a harmony so absurdly difficult to explain in words as evident in itself when viewing a photo spatially well built. Naturally, this requires a certain calm and reflection previous to the act of capturing, to certify that the photographic process as such has begun long before pressing the camera shutter. And in Drew’s work will find many examples of that this has been that way.

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Drew uses a Fuji XE2 and Fuji XF35mm 1.4mm lens plus forty year old legacy manual focus lenses and a compact Fuji X100 of whose quality he feels particularly satisfied. Years ago he enjoyed a classic Olympus OM1, period from which  he retains his love for the film that shoots in the lovely little Kodak Retinette, made in Germany. The care and thoroughness with which he plans and makes his photographs are equally extended  to its processing, to which he attaches great importance as a means to bring out the best possible detail and color from each shot. To do this he usually uses Lightroom 6 and Snapseed for snapshots made with iPad and iPhone.
-Juan Manuel
Thanks so much to The Photographer Society for this wonderful article and to Juan Manuel for his perceptive and thoughtful writing.  Drew

Colour in Street Photography: the dilemma

Landscape and product photographers like me are fascinated by street photography: it sucks us in, we are drawn to it,  yet shy of getting in close.  It seems strange to have no horizons, no limits and to go back to the old style zone focus method we used when shooting film.  Then there is the dilemma, should I process my shots in black and white or colour?  There is an often cited theory that colour distracts from the story. Hence, I suppose we see so many street shots on Instagram, Tumblr,and Twitter in black and white, contrasty, filmic, old style  and full of depth.  Yet every now and then I come across someone I admire in the Photography world posting wonderful colour street images and these seem to me to be equally valuable, to have a vibrance and quality that cannot always be conveyed in B and W. And, they seem to tell a story equally well.  So here are some street shots using both formats. Which is best? As usual I will leave this up to the viewer to decide.

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Venice, last light: A little lens flare, Fuji XE2 XF 35mm 1.4

 

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Evening sunlight, Venice. Fuji XE2 with XF35mm 1.4

I have to admit the contrast in the black and white image with the wall, leading away into the distance is my favourite here.!

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This gentleman just looked up as I shot him, the good old Fuji X100 did the trick even though it was gloomy in the bar.

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French Gentleman: Fuji X100

Fuji X100 and that special filmic quality

I still love how the original 12mp sensor in the fuji X100 renders images.  It seems to me these jpgs don’t have that digital fingerprint which some viewers find distracting. The difference is quite subtle but side by side with the Fuji XE2 there is,  I reckon,  a softer more filmic look. That is not to say that I don’t love the XE2 especially now with the firmware upgrade which has brought this camera up to a pocket rocket beauty.  I hardly remember though ever getting duff shots with the X100, I know that sounds daft! but even quick snaps, cropped like crazy have that dreamy analogue look.  Here is one from Italy shot into shade in bright sunlight..

 

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Street Phtotography: How close should you go?

As a landscape and ceramic photographer I am tentative about shooting ‘street’.  How close do I get, do I make eye contact, is it a little sneaky?  So for me whenever I do take the camera into the scary urban jungle I look for a story, an image that says something about the moment, that captures an instant in a life.  The Fuji XF 35mm 1.4 is just right I’m my view to get in close enough without being too intrusive.  Here is someone having a giggling fit….

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